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(A Shorter Workweek in the 1980s)

 

LIST OF TABLES

 

go to Chapter 1

figure 1-1: Changes in employment status of Americans, 1939 to 1947 *

figure 1-2: Annual benefit payments and average number of recipients in Social Security programs, 1920 to 1979 *

 

go to Chapter 2

figure 2-1: Productivity, output, employment, and average hours in 1977 compared with level in 1947 for manufacturing industries and the private business sector *

figure 2-2: Decline in average workweek of production or nonsupervisory workers in private nonagricultural industries between 1947 and 1978, showing effect of shift in manpower between industries *

figure 2-3: Average workweek of nonstudent male workers employed in nonagricultural industries, 1948 to 1977, compared with average for all U.S. civilian workers *

figure 2-4: Hours worked by full-time wage and salary workers in nonagricultural industries, selected years, 1948 to 1978 *

figure 2-5: Percent distribution by level of weekly hours of retail workers in establishments covered and not covered by the 1961 amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act while the law was being introduced, 1961 to 1965 *

figure 2-6: Percent distribution of hours of work of nonagricultural wage and salary workers, selected years, May 1948 to May 1976 *

figure 2-7: Estimates of additional hours per year of paid leisure gained by U.S. full-time workers between 1940 and 1979 *

figure 2-8: Leisure provisions in several industrial nations, 1977 *

figure 2-9: Unemployment and productivity levels in years 1910 to 1978 *

figure 2-10: Comparison by industry: Gain in employment 1950 to 1979 with 1979 average hourly wage *

figure 2-11: Comparison by occupation: Gain in employment 1950 to 1978 with 1978 median weekly earnings *

figure 2-12: Jobs expected to have the most openings, 1978 to 1990 *

figure 2-13: Gross National Product, 1947 to 1977, input in billions of 1958 dollars *

figure 2-14: Gross National Product, 1947 to 1977, output in billions of 1958 dollars *

figure 2-15: Personal consumption expenditures in U.S. economy for 1959 and 1977and B.L.S. projections for 1977 *

figure 2-16: U.S. per-capita production of certain commodities, 1935-1970 *

figure 2-17: Labor-force participation of American women in several categories of family status, 1950 to 1978 *

 

go to Chapter 3

figure 3-1: Hypothetical trade off between shorter weekly hours and unemployment in 1979 *

figure 3-2: Employment status of U.S. population in 1979 *

figure 3-3: Full-time and part-time work force in 1979 *

figure 3-4: Employment, average hours, and man-hours Worked in U.S. economy, as reported during 1979 *

figure 3-5: Work Sharing Calculation: Unemployed workers employed *

figure 3-6: Persons not in the labor force in 1979, by reason for not seeking work and whether or not want a job now *

figure 3-7: Subsequent labor-force participation found in B.L.S. survey of persons "not in the labor force" in 1976 *

figure 3-8: Growth of government and private-Industry nonproduction jobs in U.S. economy, 1947 to 1979 *

figure 3-9: Calculation of the excess number of government and private-industry nonproduction workers who might go into productive jobs if the workweek were cut *

figure 3-10: Work-Sharing Calculation: Workers to be added from labor-force reserves *

figure 3-11: Employment, average hours, and man-hours worked in the U.S. economy if work sharing had been Implemented in 1979 *

figure 3-12: Summary of shifts in manpower *

figure 3-13: Summary of changes in man-hours *

 

go to Chapter 6

figure 6-1: Comparison of growth rates of "measurable economic welfare" by Nordhaus-Tobin method, 1950-52 to 1970-73 *

figure 6-2: An illustration of how the U.S. government stands to lose tax revenues if incomes were shared among a wider group of people *

figure 6-3: Gini index of earnings distribution for U.S. male and female workers, 1958 to 1977 *

 

go to Chapter 8

figure 8-1: Comparison of trends in average workweek, productivity, real hourly wages, and cost of living for all U.S. industries, 1890 to 1926 *

figure 8-2: Comparison of trends in average workweek, productivity, real hourly wages, and cost of living for U.S. manufacturing industries, 1899 to 1926 *

figure 8-3: Comparison of annual changes in productivity, real weekly earnings, and cost of living in periods of faster or slower progress toward a shorter workweek, 1890 to 1926 *

figure 8-4: Comparison of trends in average workweek, productivity, real hourly wages, and cost of living for U.S. manufacturing industries, 1919 to 1950 *

figure 8-5: Comparison of annual changes in productivity, real weekly earnings, and cost of living in periods of faster or slower progress toward a shorter workweek, 1919 to 1950 *

figure 8-6: Comparison of trends in average workweek, productivity, real hourly compensation and cost of living for all U.S. Industries, 1947 to 1979 *

figure 8-7: Comparison of trends in average workweek, productivity, real hourly compensation and cost of living for U.S. manufacturing industries, 1947 to 1979 *

figure 8-8: Comparison of annual changes in productivity, real hourly compensation, and cost of living in periods of faster or slower progress toward a shorter workweek, 1947 to 1979 *

figure 8-9: Long-term trends in average workweek, productivity, per-capita real GNP, and cost of living for U.S. economy, 1850 to 1977 - three sources *

figure 8-10: Comparison of annual changes in average workweek, productivity, per-capita real GNP, and cost of living for U.S. economy, 1850 to 1977 - three sources *

figure 8-11: Comparison of changes in average workweeks and in average hourly earnings for production workers in 24 manufacturing industries, July 1914 to June 1936 *

figure 8-12: Comparison of changes in average workweeks of production workers and average wholesale or producer prices for several manufacturing industries, 1947 to 1978 *

figure 8-13: Changes in average workweek, productivity, real hourly earnings, and cost of living in manufacturing for ten industrial nations, 1960 to 1976 *

 

go to Chapter 9

figure 9-1: Maximum estimated energy savings per year through three forms of alternative work schedules as determined by MATHTECH study *

figure 9-2: Principal mode of transportation to work of U.S. workers by residence, 1975 annual averages *

 

go to Chapter 10

figure 10-1: Comparison of overtime cost per hour in 1975 with each dollar of straight-time wages *

 

Note: All 51 tables are included in the English-language version of this web site as indicated by *.

 

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